Film noir, milkshakes, and an open mind (Part 2)

Isabel (Izzy) D’Angelo, one of the 10th Annual Young Playwrights Festival playwrights, continues her conversation about the experience with Julie Tosh, her dramaturg. (See Part 1, with a more complete intro, posted on October 1.)

Playwright Isabel D'Angelo (right) listens to the read-through of playwright Hannah Newman's (left) play at the first rehearsal for the Young Playwrights Festival.

Playwright Isabel D'Angelo (right) listens to the read-through of playwright Hannah Newman's (left) play at the first rehearsal for the Young Playwrights Festival.

by Isabel D’Angelo and Julie Tosh

Julie: So, Isabel, after weeks of rehearsal on “Betrayal,” it’s finally come to show time! You got to see the show with several different audiences and had time to reflect on the entire experience. Since this is our last time to sit down together and chat, why don’t you let us know how the experience was for you. First of all, what was it like to see the school matinee?

Izzy: Seeing my play with a huge portion of my school was overwhelming. I literally cannot explain how nerve-racking it was. Their response was so pleasing though. I’d say I enjoyed the audience on that morning the most because their reactions were not stifled at all, a true Wash High trait. I’ve been getting really positive feedback from the kids at school, so I am very happy with the way that turned out.

Julie: It had to be a real bonus to have your teacher there as well. How was the experience with your family different?

Izzy: Watching my play with my family was definitely different from watching it with my peers.  I wasn’t quite as nervous so I was able to look around at the audience’s reactions. That was really interesting. My mom picked up on a lot of little things I added into my play because she is the one who got me hooked on Hitchcock and could identify his influences.  

Julie: You know, audience reaction is a big source of information for writers. Being able to see their reactions and judge the silences can tell a playwright a lot about what is working with a play. I noticed the rapt attention of audience members. That was a great sign! How has the overall experience affected you or changed you as a writer?

Izzy: Needless to say, this experience has been really amazing. I hate saying “amazing” because it’s so nondescript, but I cannot think of a word that actually captures the way I feel about the whole thing. It was totally unique and exciting, and it definitely gave some confidence to a timid writer. 

Julie: Any advice for playwriting hopefuls?

Izzy: My advice to playwriting hopefuls is to keep writing, submit even if you have doubts, and don’t ever, EVER delete anything!

Julie: Working together has been a wonderful experience, may I even say amazing. It may have had something to do with those first milkshakes, but making a good connection between playwright and dramaturg can make for a very rewarding revision process and lead to fruitful rehearsals.

Until next year…this is Isabel D’Angelo and Julie Tosh signing off.

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